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From Thanksgiving to Hanukkah to Christmas and more, there is no doubt that November kicks off the holiday season for people in Illinois from a variety of cultures and backgrounds. Which is why for parents who are divorced or separated, taking the time to form a holiday parenting schedule now is a smart idea. If you need assistance in the formation of a holiday parenting schedule that both you and your child’s other parent can live with, please contact the offices of Fay, Farrow & Associates, P.C. today.

Why Form a Holiday Parenting Schedule?

Everyone knows how stressful the holidays can be, and the last thing that you want to have to worry about is with whom your shared child will celebrate. Not only will this create more stress for you, but fighting over parenting time during the holidays can create anxiety for your child as well, having a negative effect on their psychological and emotional wellbeing. Developing a co-parenting plan for the holidays can also be a nice way to blend different family traditions and put aside differences for the time being.

Things Your Holiday Parenting Schedule Should Include

You don’t want to just form a parenting plan for the holidays; you want to form a parenting plan that is comprehensive. This should include details such as whether or not time on holidays will be split between parents or given exclusively to one parent; how a child will be transferred from one home to the other for holidays; whether or not a child will be leaving the state or country (perhaps to visit other family members or take a holiday trip); and how any disagreements or schedule changes will be settled.

How to Form a Holiday Parenting Schedule

While you may want to create an arrangement that keeps your child’s best interests in mind, there is no doubt that spending time without your child during the holiday–especially if this is the first holiday after a divorce–can be emotional and even grief-filled. Rather than prioritizing these emotions, when you are in the process of creating your holiday parenting schedule with your child’s other parent, be sure to:

  • Focus on communication – say what you want, but be prepared to listen to what your child’s other parent wants too.
  • Remain open to compromise – it’s likely that you both want the child for Christmas (or another holiday). Focus on how you can create an arrangement that is based on compromise, such as sharing Christmas day equally (one parent gets the morning hours, the other the afternoon/evening), spending Christmas together, or trading Christmas for another day, such as Christmas Eve or the child’s birthday.
  • Be respectful and kind – remember that whatever happened between you and your spouse, your child’s other parent loves your child just as much as you do. Put your child first, and be respectful and kind during all scheduled talks.

We Are Here to Help

At the law offices of Fay, Farrow & Associates, P.C., our Illinois family law attorneys are here to help you reach a holiday parenting schedule. To learn more about our legal services and why working with an attorney is wise, call us today or send us a message online. We serve Naperville, Downers Grove, Wheaton and surrounding areas.

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